Baby fox

As the winter days are long gone and baby animals are roaming around parks, schools and trails, Denver Animal Protection officials are reminding everyone to leave wildlife alone. 

As the winter days are long gone and baby animals are roaming around parks, schools and trails, Denver Animal Protection officials are reminding everyone to leave wildlife alone. 

The reminder comes after protection officers were called to an incident where people allowed baby raccoons into their homes and played with them, which poses a risk of contracting, spreading rabies, according to a news release.

"The best thing to do if you see an animal you think may be abandoned or needs help, is to report it," officials said in the release. 

Although animal protection recognizes that people are trying to do good, they want people to know that many baby animals are rarely orphaned and most of the time, their mother is nearby. 

Unfortunately, if good Samaritans intervene it does more harm than good, officials said. 

"So as our days grow longer and warmer, remember, by trying to help wildlife, you might be hurting them," officials said in the release. "A young animal's best chance for survival is with its parents who can ensure its ears all its natural behaviors for survival in the world. 

Not only is interacting with baby animals dangerous to them, it poses a threat to people as they could have rabies or other viruses that could spread to pets and humans. 

Anyone who sees a sick or injured wildlife, or believes a baby has been abandoned is urged to contact animal protecting by calling 311 or by calling the Denver Police Departments non-emergency line at 720-913-2000.